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July 1933

USE OF SODIUM AMYTAL IN PREVENTION OF REACTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH LUMBAR PUNCTURE

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the School of Medicine and the Syphilis Clinic of the University Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, Dr. John H. Stokes, director.

Arch NeurPsych. 1933;30(1):170-174. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1933.02240130178012
Abstract

In the decades that have lapsed since its introduction by Quincke,1 lumbar puncture has passed from the realm of surgery into that of diagnostic medicine and therapeutics. Yet, despite simplification and many refinements of technic, reactions following lumbar puncture, even when the operation is performed by an expert physician, are frequent and distressing. According to Stokes,2 when every precaution is used, some degree of reaction occurs in from 15 to 25 per cent of patients when they arise from bed on the day following puncture. Under similar conditions, Nelson3 reported the incidence of reactions as being about 20 per cent. In a small series, Alpers4 found the incidence of headaches following puncture to be about 17.5 per cent. In 852 patients, Perkel5 noted signs of meningism in 37.7 per cent, appearing from one to ten days after puncture. While reactions may be expected in from

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