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August 1933

EPILEPSY: XIII. AURA IN EPILEPSY; A STATISTICAL REVIEW OF 1,359 CASES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Neurological Unit, Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Neuropathology, Harvard Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1933;30(2):374-387. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1933.02240140138007
Abstract

There are many inaccuracies in present knowledge concerning persons who are subject to epileptic seizures. This is due in large part to the absence of an adequate body of statistical data. There has, indeed, been a multitude of reports covering single cases or small groups of patients, but the facts detailed, though valuable in themselves, give no clue as to the relative frequency of the observed phenomena. Information which has been compiled concerning large groups has been drawn almost entirely from institutional patients. In the United States these compose only about 7 per cent of persons subject to epilepsy and are not, therefore, representative. In the nature of the case, institutions house especially those who are physically or mentally incompetent.

Reynolds,1 in 1861, drew attention to the lack of dependable and proportioned knowledge concerning epilepsy in the following words: "The trustworthy beliefs of the day are compounded with the

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