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June 1934

ENCEPHALOMALACIA IN INFANTS: (VIRCHOW'S INTERSTITIAL ENCEPHALITIS)

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Neurology, University of Illinois, College of Medicine CHICAGO

From the laboratory of neuropathology of the University of Illinois, College of Medicine, Dr. Hassin, Director.

Arch NeurPsych. 1934;31(6):1153-1164. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1934.02250060039003
Abstract

Cerebral softening in infants, considered by some since the days of Virchow to be a peculiar form of encephalitis, is not uncommon. As extensive studies of recent years have shown, trauma at birth is the important, if not the only, underlying factor, in contrast to vascular lesions (thrombosis, embolism and the like), so frequent in cerebral softening in adults. Though marked softening was present in the two cases reported here, no history of trauma at birth was elicited.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.— 

History.  —A white female infant, aged 7 weeks, was brought to the Research and Educational Hospitals of the University of Illinois on Sept. 12, 1930, because of restlessness, sleeplessness, constipation and dyspnea on crying. She was born at term, was apparently normal at birth and was breast fed.

Examination.  —The infant was fairly well nourished and not acutely ill. The scalp was normal. The left parietal bone

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