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August 1934

SPINAL ANESTHESIA INEFFECTIVE FOR OPERATION ON TUMOR OF THE CAUDA EQUINA

Arch NeurPsych. 1934;32(2):395-396. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1934.02250080141008
Abstract

This communication presents an instance of the failure of spinal anesthesia in an operation on a tumor of the cauda equina. The observations are of importance because they support the supposition, which is only fairly well established, that the drug used in spinal anesthesia produces its effect by a blockade of impulses in the spinal root filaments rather than by a direct action on sensory fibers in the cord itself.

REPORT OF CASE1 

Clinical History.  —Ulric L., a French shoemaker, aged 40, father of six children, was admitted to the surgical service of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital on Oct. 4, 1922, because of incontinence of urine and feces and pain and weakness in the legs. His heart had suffered damage during four attacks of inflammatory rheumatism, but he had been working until ten weeks before admission. The present illness had begun approximately four years before, with the onset

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