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September 1934

OLFACTORY IMAGINATION AND OLFACTORY HALLUCINATIONS: AN EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL STUDY OF THE SENSE OF SMELL IN NORMAL AND IN PSYCHOTIC PERSONS

Arch NeurPsych. 1934;32(3):467-492. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1934.02250090002001
Abstract

This study is concerned with the subjective part of olfactory sensation. Recent psychiatric research1 has stressed the importance of the study of the subjective aspects of perception in attempting to solve problems of psychiatry and theoretical psychology of the senses. The question of the mechanics of orientation in the external world, as well as the mechanics of illusions, hallucinations, etc., in patients with mental disease is involved in this problem. Contact with the world of reality in the last analysis depends on perception of sensation mediated by the five senses. Next to direct sensational images, the reality of which is tacitly assumed in consciousness, after-effects of sensations possess the character of reality immediately associated with perception. Eidetic images (Jaensch2) and memory images (representations), although their realness as compared with actual images is less, can and often do have a character of reality close to that of the sensory

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