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March 1935

A SIMPLE ROUTINE PROCEDURE FOR STAINING THE NEURONS AND GLIA OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

Brooklyn

From the Department of Pathology, Long Island College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1935;33(3):616-622. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1935.02250150166012
Abstract

A great step forward in the study of the elements of the nervous system and their pathologic alterations was made by the Spanish school of histologists, particularly Ramón y Cajal1 and del Rio Hortega,2 with the introduction of the gold and silver methods now in use. Because they necessitate the use of fresh material in small sections for the proper penetration of special and diverse fixatives and the staining of the tissues within short prescribed periods of time, difficulties are encountered, excellent as these methods are. Since it is often impossible to fix the nerve tissue shortly after death and it is frequently advantageous to study the hardened brain grossly before sectioning is undertaken, a routine fixative must be used which will meet these requirements. Not only are special fixatives required, but numerous stains are necessary to complete a satisfactory study of the tissues. In addition, many times,

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