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August 1935

MOULAGES: THEIR PREPARATION AND SERVICE TO THE NEUROPATHOLOGIST

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Division of Neuropathology, the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1935;34(2):355-361. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1935.02250200115009
Abstract

It is the experience of every one concerned with the study of anatomic alterations in the central nervous system that in the more or less obscure conditions exhaustive histologic studies often prevent the preservation of the gross specimen. This difficulty is readily recognized in any example of widespread disease of the brain, particularly if the lesion is neoplastic and as such deforms the brain or disrupts many of its parts. In such an instance it is often necessary to cut the brain into numerous segments and to dismember it almost beyond recognition. In order to preserve a record of the gross appearance of the disease process the brain is usually photographed before it is sectioned. This procedure, however, does not provide a true three-dimensional view of the organ. Thus, on many occasions, to preserve the brain for subsequent gross topographic studies it is allowed to remain uncut except for the

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