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January 1936

THE CONVULSION THRESHOLD OF VARIOUS PARTS OF THE CAT'S BRAIN

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Johnson Foundation for Medical Physics, University of Pennsylvania, and the Department of Neuropathology, Harvard Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(1):109-116. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260010119009
Abstract

In this investigation we have attempted to determine the relative ease or difficulty with which convulsions can be produced by electrical stimulation of various parts of the cat's brain. The problem has significance because it bears directly on the question of whether or not a special part of the brain is concerned with the production of convulsions, a question of major importance to those interested in the etiology of epileptic seizures.

METHOD  With a cat under ether anesthesia a 24 gage needle electrode of the type used by Adrian and Bronk1 was inserted into the brain through a perforated metal plug screwed into a small bur hole in the skull. This type of electrode is made by running an insulated wire through a hollow needle, such as is used for venipuncture or subcutaneous injection, and by sealing the wire in place. In our experiments the wire in the needle

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