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January 1936

ASYMMETRY: UNILATERAL ATROPHY AND FACIAL HYPERTROPHY: Report of Cases

Author Affiliations

Madison, Wis.

From the department of neuropsychiatry, University of Wisconsin Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(1):136-145. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260010146013
Abstract

It is common knowledge that asymmetry is a constant feature of human development. However, gross asymmetry which is at once discernible, even if of one part, is rare, and a decided inequality of the two halves of the body constitutes the rarest of developmental anomalies, according to Halperin.1 It is estimated that the number of cases of complete unilateral atrophy reported is less than twenty-five, while seventy-two cases of hemiphypertrophy have been reported.

Hemiatrophy, first described by Broca2 in 1859, may be of various types, the commonest being facial atrophy. Less common are the crossed (the face involved on one side and the body on the opposite side) and the complete unilateral type. Many theories concerning the etiology have been developed, none of which is wholly satisfactory. It is my purpose in this paper not to present these theories but to present clinical data that may be helpful

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