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February 1936

CEREBROSPINAL HYDRODYNAMICSVII. EFFECTS OF THE INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF HYPERTONIC SOLUTIONS OF DEXTROSE

Author Affiliations

Assistant in Psychiatry, University of Chicago Clinics CHICAGO

From the Baltimore City Hospital and the Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Baltimore.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(2):296-303. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260020090007
Abstract

In a previous article of this series1 it was shown that if after the rapid removal of 35 cc. or more of cerebrospinal fluid from a human subject the pressure of the fluid was allowed to become restored spontaneously to normal and then the same amount of fluid was again drained, the fall in cerebrospinal fluid pressure effected by the second drainage fairly consistently exceeded that produced by the first. This phenomenon was interpreted to indicate that in the interval of time between the first and the second drainage the volume of the ventriculomeningeal spaces had diminished, but whether the diminution was the result of cerebrospinal vascular congestion alone or was in part attributable also to neuraxial edema could not be determined from the data then at hand. In a subsequent report2 evidence was presented to indicate that hypertonic solutions of dextrose when injected intravenously in sufficient amount

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