[Skip to Navigation]
Other
March 1936

RELATION OF THE CEREBRUM TO THE CEREBELLUM: II. CEREBELLAR TREMOR IN THE MONKEY AND ITS ABSENCE AFTER REMOVAL OF THE PRINCIPAL EXCITABLE AREAS OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX (AREAS 4 AND 6a, UPPER PART) III. ACCENTUATION OF CEREBELLAR TREMOR FOLLOWING LESIONS OF THE PREMOTOR AREA (AREA 6a, UPPER PART)

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Laboratory of Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(3):439-466. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260030011001
Abstract

In the first paper of this series Fulton, Liddell and Rioch1 demonstrated in the cat that the cerebral hemispheres are responsible for the genesis of cerebellar tremor. They found that after decerebellation the tremor appeared only when the voluntary movements became reestablished and that removal of the cerebral hemispheres subsequent to decerebellation abolished tremor in the extremities opposite to the cerebral lesion; marked extensor rigidity also came on immediately after the cortical ablation. Vigorous reflex movements could still be evoked, but these movements were unaccompanied by cerebellar tremor. On the basis of their results and of the observations of Munk,2 of Dusser de Barenne3 and of Walshe,4 who showed in man that cerebellar tremor is present only in voluntary movements, it was concluded that the nervous mechanism involved in the phenomenon of cerebellar tremor includes some part of the cerebral hemispheres. The present paper will offer

×