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April 1936

EFFECT OF EXPERIMENTAL TEMPORARY VASCULAR OCCLUSION ON THE SPINAL CORD: I. CORRELATION BETWEEN STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHANGES

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Anatomical Laboratory and the Department of Medicine, Division of Neuropsychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(4):789-807. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260040097007
Abstract

In a recent publication Cowdry1 indicated the problems confronting the cytologist and the neuropathologist in their study of the nervous system. The possibility of analyzing the functions of the nerve cell in correlation with its histologic structure and chemical activity during pathologic states promises an advance toward the understanding of its normal physiologic and metabolic activities. Numerous observations have been made, in the study both of experimental and of pathologic material, on the influences of noxious agents on nerve cells, but too frequently they have been based on dead or dying tissues. For the problem under consideration it seemed more pertinent to investigate the reactions of injured nerve cells during their response to and recovery from injury.

In the experiments conducted in this study it was desired to produce a disturbance in the nutrition of the nerve cells which could be controlled both in degree and in duration. A

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