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May 1936

ENCEPHALOGRAPHY: A REVIEW OF EIGHT HUNDRED ENCEPHALOGRAMS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO SUBDURAL AIR

Author Affiliations

Resident Psychiatrist, Colorado Psychopathologic Hospital

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(5):990-1001. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260050064005
Abstract

Since its inception in 19191 encephalography has become increasingly popular as a method of psychiatric diagnosis and research. The presence of pathologic changes too subtle for postmortem demonstration has been assumed on the basis of abnormal encephalographic findings alone.2 For this reason, organic changes are diagnosed in cases of psychiatric conditions which heretofore have always been considered to be functional disorders.

Jacobi and Winkler3 were unable to find a single normal encephalogram in 19 cases of chronic schizophrenia. Moore, Nathan, Elliott and Laubach2 obtained encephalograms of 60 patients with schizophrenia, and although their patients were selected so as to eliminate known organic factors and although 10 gave no evidence of deterioration, none of the encephalograms showed a normal pattern. The same workers4 examined 38 patients with manic-depressive psychosis and again were unable to find a single normal encephalogram. It seems unusual that organic changes were

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