[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.225.194.144. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
May 1936

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON HEADACHE: OBSERVATIONS ON HEADACHE PRODUCED BY HISTAMINE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(5):1054-1069. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260050128008
Abstract

The purpose of this communication is to present evidence concerning one mechanism of headache. The data demonstrate how under the given experimental conditions headache is produced and indicate the sites of origin of the nerve impulses which are interpreted as pain.

It is generally agreed that most of the intracranial contents, including the brain substance and large portions of the meninges, are not the sites of origin of painful sensations.1 However, the more recent reports of many neurosurgeons, including Craig,1a Elsberg,1e Fay,1d Foerster2 and Penfield,1g indicate that the large dural vessels, notably the arteries and possibly the dura itself in the neighborhood of these vessels, are regions from which a sensation of pain can be produced by adequate stimulation. To these Penfield1g added the venous sinuses of the dura.

Fay1d has initiated painful sensations by stimulation of the larger arteries of the

×