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June 1936

RELATIONSHIP OF THE SYSTOLIC TO THE DIASTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE IN SCHIZOPHRENIA: THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE

Author Affiliations

WORCESTER, MASS.

From the Research Service of the Worcester State Hospital and the Memorial Foundation for Neuro-Endocrine Research.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;35(6):1256-1261. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260060098008
Abstract

The relationship of the systolic to the diastolic blood pressure has been studied by Hoskins and Jellinek.1 They reported for large groups of normal and schizophrenic subjects between-individual correlation coefficients of 0.43±0.05 and 0.62±0.05, respectively. The corresponding regression coefficients were 0.377 and 0.521. The more constant relationship of these variables for the patients has been interpreted as indicating a tendency of the cardiovascular system to approach more closely than normal a rigid hydrodynamic system.

The autonomic nervous system is intimately concerned with cardiovascular regulation. A pharmacodynamic investigation of that system has shown the effect of certain drugs on the relationship of the systolic to the diastolic blood pressure. Freeman and Carmichael2 injected epinephrine, the sympathomimetic drug, intravenously. This caused the correlation coefficient in patients to drop from 0.52 to 0.18. If an injection of epinephrine caused the lowering of the correlation coefficient to such an extent, it seems

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