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July 1936

INSULIN IN TREATMENT FOR SYMPTOMS CAUSED BY WITHDRAWAL OF MORPHINE AND HEROIN: A Report of Ten Cases

Author Affiliations

Cincinnati

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(1):162-169. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260070172013
Abstract

Many methods for the management of the symptoms produced by withdrawal of morphine have been advocated, one of the more recent of which was proposed in 1930 by Manfred Sakel,1 who suggested the administration of insulin as symptomatically ameliorating and physiologically correct. For the past eighteen months I have used this method, with results which in general corroborate the reports of other clinicians.2 I include here a report of the first ten consecutive cases in this clinic in which such treatment was instituted.

The regimen of abrupt and complete withdrawal was rigidly adhered to regardless of the quantity of the drug to which the patient had become addicted. Ten units of insulin was given to each patient shortly after admission, in order to observe and anticipate a possible hypoglycemic reaction. Thereafter insulin was given only as indicated by the patient's discomfort. No arbitrary size or frequency of dose

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