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August 1936

VASOMOTOR DISTURBANCE AND EDEMA ASSOCIATED WITH CEREBRAL HEMIPLEGIA

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard), the Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard University Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(2):362-372. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260080134008
Abstract

It has long been recognized that partial or complete hemiplegia occurring as the result of a cerebrovascular accident is often accompanied by vasomotor disturbances and edema over the paralyzed extremities. Many clinical observations have been made and much experimental work has been performed on animals in order to determine the nature and mechanism of these disturbances since Chevallier1 published his thesis on this subject in 1867. In recent communications Brickner,2 Olsen3 and Bucy4 have thoroughly discussed the literature on the subject. Summarizing the available evidence, one reaches the following conclusions regarding the observations concerning peripheral vascular and vasomotor changes in human beings:

1. As a rule the blood pressure in the paralyzed arm is not significantly or constantly altered in comparison with that on the normal side. Both higher and lower readings have been recorded, and some observers have contended that the blood pressure is lower

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