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August 1936

MULTIPLE HEREDITARY HEMANGIOBLASTOMAS OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(2):384-391. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260080156012
Abstract

Angiomatosis of the nervous system has been recognized as a peculiar type of developmental defect since the original and important contribution of Lindau.1 He called attention to the association of Hippel's disease (angiomatosis retinae) with angiomatous tumors of the cerebellum and other parts of the central nervous system and with a variety of systemic abnormalities, particularly pancreatic and renal cysts and hypernephroid tumors of the kidney. He considered these lesions to be the result of a perverted development of the mesodermal germinal layer, beginning probably in the third month of fetal life. The clinicopathologic contribution has been amply confirmed by many observers. As further evidence of the anomalous developmental nature of Lindau's disease cases have been described in which the condition is hereditary and in which multiple hemangioblastomas have been found in the central nervous system.

The case reported here is such a one. There was a family history

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