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November 1936

CONSTITUTIONAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DETERIORATED AND NONDETERIORATED PATIENTS WITH EPILEPSY: I. STIGMAS OF DEGENERACY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Nervous and Mental Diseases, the Northwestern University Medical School and the Minnie Frances Kleman Memorial Fund.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(5):1037-1044. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260110122009
Abstract

For a few years prior to 1927 one of us (H. A. P.) had the opportunity to observe patients with epilepsy in a state hospital. These patients presented characteristic changes in personality: loss of interest, practical inefficiency, excessive religious devotion, virtuous posturing, failure of memory, irritability, egocentricity, disorders of behavior, inactivity, vanity and boastfulness—changes typical of the textbook description of deterioration associated with epilepsy. For a few years after 1927 the same one of us (H. A. P.) was assistant to Dr. Hugh T. Patrick in his private practice and observed under the guidance of this master patients with epilepsy who applied to him for treatment. These presented an entirely different picture, one in which the changes in personality just mentioned were absent. These patients were making their way in their own social, economic, business, artistic and professional worlds with the same ease and grace as their fellowmen; not a

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