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November 1936

EMOTIONAL FACTORS IN MENTAL RETARDATION: A READING PROBLEM

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(5):1049-1067. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260110134011

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Abstract

The psychiatry of childhood differs from the psychiatry of adulthood in several important particulars. Although one cannot safely assume that the mind of the new-born infant is entirely a blank, from the conventional point of view it is nearly that, whereas the mind of the adult has been exposed to the influence of convention throughout childhood and hence is bound to be biased. Perhaps the other reasons for the differences between these two aspects of psychiatry depend on this fundamental fact. However, there are mechanisms whereby these differences express themselves. One important point of view is associated with and dependent on the rate at which a child constantly learns. Such a process, of course, means constant change. This is particularly important when one realizes how severe man is toward his mistakes. A person can be right many times and have no particular emotional reaction therefrom, but if he is wrong

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