[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.225.194.144. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
December 1936

HISTOLOGIC STUDIES OF THE BRAIN IN CASES OF FATAL INJURY TO THE HEAD: VI. CYTO-ARCHITECTONIC ALTERATIONS

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

From the Department of Neurology and the Cajal Laboratory of Neuropathology of the Los Angeles County Hospital and the Department of Neurology of the College of Medical Evangelists.

Arch NeurPsych. 1936;36(6):1277-1293. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1936.02260120124008
Abstract

The possible cause of residual posttraumatic nervous symptoms has long been the subject of discussion. Variance in opinion as to the origin of these manifestations has given rise to two schools of thought. It is held by one school that such symptoms are largely of psychogenic origin and are the direct result of mental and emotional shock incident to the injury. The second group, on the other hand, believe that posttraumatic manifestations are due predominantly to organic lesions of the brain, although the character and distribution of such lesions have not been clearly established. It was our interest in this question that led us to begin what has proved to be a rather prolonged investigation of the changes in the elements of the brain following severe injury. While it is recognized that a study of morphologic changes could scarcely be expected to explain so variable a clinical picture, it was

×