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February 1937

GENICULATE NEURALGIA (NEURALGIA OF THE NERVUS FACIALIS): A FURTHER CONTRIBUTION TO THE SENSORY SYSTEM OF THE FACIAL NERVE AND ITS NEURALGIC CONDITIONS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons NEW YORK

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(2):253-285. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260140039003
Abstract

It is thirty years since I made my first report to the American Neurological Association on herpetic inflammation of the geniculate ganglion and geniculate neuralgia.1 This subject I elaborated in some detail in a series of subsequent publications.2 Up to that time the facial nerve in man had been regarded as essentially motor; its sensory system —the nerve of Wrisberg and the geniculate ganglion and its peripheral divisions—were accorded only secretory, vasomotor and gustatory functions.

Spiller,3 however, had already drawn attention to the preservation of deep sensibility of the face in the anesthetic area after removal of the gasserian ganglion, which supported the hypothesis of Henry Head that motor nerves convey sensory fibers of deep sensibility. Cushing4 also had indicated in his studies of the trigeminal field after operation on the gasserian ganglion the preservation of a crude form of tactile sensibility on the anterior two

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