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March 1937

STRUCTURE OF THE NERVE ROOT: I. NATURE OF THE JUNCTION BETWEEN THE CENTRAL AND THE PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL, CANADA

From the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University, and the Montreal Neurological Institute.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(3):555-583. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260150085005
Abstract

The principal terra incognita in the histology of the cerebrospinal nerve root has concerned its central glial segment and the nature of its junction with the peripheral segment. The inadequacy of staining technic has been largely the cause of the retardation in the study of these problems. Recent improvements in the metallic impregnation methods of the Spanish school, enabling a more complete portrayal of neuroglia, Schwann cells and reticulin, afford an opportunity to supply this deficiency.

My purpose in this investigation has therefore been a study of the central glial segment of the nerve root and the nature of its junction with the peripheral nerve segment.

HISTORICAL REVIEW  That a nerve root contains a central glial segment and a peripheral nonglial segment was recognized soon after Virchow discovered neuroglia by Thomsen1 and many others. Staderini,2 as well as Weigert,3 subsequently showed that the neuroglia is more dense

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