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March 1937

TRICHINIASIS INVOLVING THE NERVOUS SYSTEM: A CLINICAL AND NEUROPATHOLOGIC REVIEW, WITH REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Psychiatric Division, the Psychiatric Medical Service of the Third (New York University) Medical Division, the Departments of Medicine and Pathology of the New York University College of Medicine and the Pathological Division of the Bellevue Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(3):589-616. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260150119007
Abstract

The fact that the nervous system may actually be invaded in the course of trichiniasis is not generally appreciated. Although the literature since 1835, when Owen1 described the parasite, is voluminous, few reports of neuropathologic studies on this disease have appeared. We have been able to find ten such articles. Reports of the actual demonstration of the parasite in the brain are limited to half this number. On the other hand, clinical observations of abnormal neurologic signs have been reported more often.

In the history of the early epidemics of trichiniasis one finds occasional reference to signs of involvement of the nervous system. As early as 1866 Kratz,2 in a review of three hundred and thirty-seven cases, described patients who exhibited delirium, apathy, insomnia and anesthesia of the skin. Glazier3 considered the cerebral manifestations important enough to include meningitis in the differential diagnosis. Previous observers were stated

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