[Skip to Navigation]
Other
May 1937

NATURE AND SIGNIFICANCE OF MULTIPLE PETECHIAL HEMORRHAGES ASSOCIATED WITH TRAUMA OF THE BRAIN

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Neuropsychiatry, the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(5):1048-1076. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260170076004
Abstract

The nature and effects of injury to the brain have been the subject of investigation since earliest recorded medical history. Gross injuries of the brain and their effects are fairly well understood, but the effects of concussion, or indeed, the cause of unconsciousness, are less well known and are still the subject of discussion and controversy, which occupy the attention of the clinician and the pathologist.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  The literature on concussion up to recent years has been well covered in the important article of Jakob,1 who repeated the classic experiment of Schmaus2 on the spinal cord of the rabbit and extended the experiments to concussion of the brain. Schmaus reported four observations on the human subject in which concussion of the spinal cord produced a direct specific action on the primary tissues of the nervous system. In order to study further the effects of concussion

×