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May 1937

CONTRIBUTION MADE BY ROENTGENOGRAPHIC EVIDENCE AFTER THE INJECTION OF IODIZED OIL

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Service of the Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;37(5):1077-1082. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260170105005
Abstract

Spinal iodolography, or myelography accomplished by the injection of iodized oil into the spinal canal, had its inception only fourteen years ago.1 During the first seven years it became an exceedingly popular procedure in the diagnosis of lesions of the spinal cord. Reports in increasing numbers began to appear in the medical literature, recording favorably the results of the procedure. There appeared few warnings as to immediate complications and latent sequelae resulting from the method (Ayer and Mixter,2 Nonne,3 Lindblom,4 Sharpe and Peterson,5 Maclaire,6 Craig,7 and Ebaugh and Mella8). This diagnostic method continued to gain favor with neurologists and neurosurgeons until 1929, when a paper appeared in which Davis and his co-workers9 reported profound alterations in the leptomeninges of dogs, presumably caused by the irritating effect of iodized oil injected into the spinal subarachnoid space. They assumed that a similar condition

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