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July 1937

UNILATERAL CEREBRAL DOMINANCE AS RELATED TO MIND BLINDNESS: MINIMAL LESION CAPABLE OF CAUSING VISUAL AGNOSIA FOR OBJECTS

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

From the Department of Medicine (Neurology) of the University of Southern California School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1937;38(1):108-135. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1937.02260190118009
Abstract

The concept of unilateral cerebral dominance originated with Marc Dax,1 who in 1836 published the observation that hemiplegia affecting the right side of the body is far more often associated with loss of speech than is a similar paralysis of the left side. Through the work of Broca,2 Trousseau,3 Wernicke,4 Kussmaul,5 Jackson6 and Bastian,7 to mention only a few of the most prominent pioneers in the study of aphasia, the dominance of the major (usually the left) side of the brain over the minor side in speech was soon established, so that this is now common knowledge.

With the work of Liepmann8 on apraxia, a similar dominance for voluntary acts became recognized to some extent, but several investigators, notably von Monakow9 and his pupil Brun,10 have taken exception to this doctrine as originally outlined.

For general sensation it is established

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