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February 1938

PROTAMINE ZINC INSULIN: ITS UNSUITABILITY FOR HYPOGLYCEMIC SHOCK THERAPY

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.; CHICAGO

From the Wisconsin Psychiatric Institute, the Mendota State Hospital, Mendota, Wis., and the University of Wisconsin Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1938;39(2):232-241. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1938.02270020022002
Abstract

Various reports from Europe have attested to the success of insulin shock therapy in early stages of schizophrenia. The Vienna school, where the method was introduced by Sakel1 in October 1933, has treated well over 200 patients by now, and a report of the first 104 cases has been published in detail by Dussik and Sakel.2 Their figures show that of cases in which psychotic symptoms had existed for less than six months they secured perfect remissions (no demonstrable mental abnormality on discharge) in 73 per cent and social remissions in 12 per cent, making a total of 85 per cent in which the patients were able to return to work. Independent investigators, among whom were Glueck3 and Wortis,4 in the United States, and Strecker5 and Wilson6 in England, observed the administration of treatment in some cases in this series and interviewed many of

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