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February 1938

HYPOGLYCEMIA: NEUROLOGIC AND NEUROPATHOLOGIC STUDIES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Neurology (Dr. Moersch) and the Section on Surgical Pathology (Dr. Kernohan), the Mayo Clinic.

Arch NeurPsych. 1938;39(2):242-257. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1938.02270020032003
Abstract

Chameleon-like, the bizarre nervous symptoms due to hypoglycemia may go unrecognized for long periods unless the physician is "hypoglycemia conscious." In 1934 Rynearson and one of us (F. P. M.)1 and others, such as Sevringhaus,2 Carr,3 Bowen and Beck,4 Tedstrom,5 Wolf and his associates6 and Corff,7 pointed out that practically all patients with hypoglycemia have neurologic symptoms of one type or another. The fact remains, however, as suggested by Allan,8 that hypoglycemic states are not common, and when they first present themselves, they are readily misinterpreted because of the circumstances surrounding their development.

With Sakel's9 introduction of the insulin shock treatment for schizophrenia, an excellent opportunity was afforded for the study of the various neurologic and psychiatric manifestations occurring during the hypoglycemic state. Thus, it is now well recognized that there is no single syndrome that is pathognomonic of hypoglycemia; as

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