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June 1938

AUTONOMIC INNERVATION OF THE FACE: II. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Arch NeurPsych. 1938;39(6):1238-1249. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1938.02270060128006
Abstract

In a previous paper1 we demonstrated that after section of the oculomotor nerve electrical stimulation of the first division of the fifth nerve is followed by widening of the ipsilateral palpebral fissure. The muscular contraction was slow and was sustained for a period after the electrical stimulation was stopped. The same phenomenon could be produced by the injection of acetylcholine or nicotine into the carotid artery. Epinephrine inhibited this reaction in some cats, whereas atropine was ineffective, regardless of the size of the dose. We assumed that the reaction was part of the so-called Vulpian-Heidenhain-Sherrington phenomenon.

As proof of this hypothesis it was necessary to review the original experiments of Philipeaux and Vulpian2 and Heidenhain.3 From our observations the following questions arose: Is it possible after section and degeneration of the hypoglossal nerve to obtain a slow movement of the tongue by stimulation of the third division

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