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August 1938

INTERCELLULAR SUBSTANCE OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX (NISSL'S CEREBRAL GRAY MATTER): PHYSIOLOGIC SIGNIFICANCE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch NeurPsych. 1938;40(2):313-321. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1938.02270080097005
Abstract

Nissl1 deplored the fact that after the appearance of the neuron theory and the demonstration of the Golgi apparatus interest in the intercellular substance of the brain practically disappeared and that in the textbooks of the day it was mentioned briefly, if at all. In the same vein, Spielmeyer2 said that there was still no possibility of demonstrating histologically the Nissl gray matter. At that time it was generally conceded that there is something in the gray substance of the central nervous system besides ganglion cells and their processes, neuroglia cells and blood and lymph vessels, since the spaces between these elements are not entirely filled.

Meynert,3 among others, maintained that there is a substance in the cortex of the brain independent of the nerve components and that the nerve cells and their processes alone do not give the picture of the gray substance. He observed that

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