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April 1939

MENTAL AND PHYSICAL GROWTH IN PUBERTAS PRAECOX: REPORT OF FIFTEEN YEARS' STUDY OF A CASE

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;41(4):755-772. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270160111009
Abstract

The subject of pubescence has a vast literature, both medical and anthropologic. Recent studies of growth reflect increased attention to the physiologic aspects of normal adolescence. Abernethy1 investigated the correlations in physical and mental growth based on a study of 487 American high school girls. She found that the average age of physiologic maturation in 48 per cent of these girls was approximately 13 years and 6 months.

Petri2 analyzed hereditary factors in the determination of menarche by comparing 51 pairs of monozygotic twins with 47 pairs of dizygotic twins. The mean difference in the menarche in the latter group was one year. The mean difference among monozygotic pairs was only two and eight-tenths months.

Pryor3 reported a serial study of the adolescent spurt of growth for 100 girls. Examinations extending over four years at six month intervals demonstrated that pubescent girls grew 26 per cent faster

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