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June 1939

ANATOMIC RELATIONS OF CEREBRAL VESSELS AND PERIVASCULAR NERVES

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL, CANADA

From the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;41(6):1207-1221. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270180135012
Abstract

Previous work on pial and intracerebral blood vessels has demonstrated occasional perivascular nerves. By use of a new technic,1 it has been possible to demonstrate them in far greater numbers than was hitherto suspected and to give a more complete account of their morphologic character. It has been possible to determine the relation of the number of perivascular nerve fibers to the size of vessels throughout the cerebral cortex. It has also been possible to show that the walls of cerebral blood vessels are not lacking in muscular elements, as has been stated.

Historically, the first mention of perivascular nerves to peripheral vessels was made on gross observation by Willis (1664).2 Descriptions of such structures on pial vessels were not given until Purkinje3 (1845) described in detail perivascular nerves accompanying the arteries in the pia of the spinal cord, cerebellum, pons and cerebrum. He noted that over

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