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July 1939

THE HYPOTHALAMIC NUCLEI IN HEAT STROKE: WITH NOTES ON THE CENTRAL REPRESENTATION OF TEMPERATURE REGULATION

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Department of Anatomy, the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1939;42(1):83-91. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1939.02270190091005
Abstract

Heat stroke is presumably a condition associated with a breakdown of the mechanisms for control of the body temperature, with resulting loss of power to adjust to an extremely high environmental temperature. In a previous investigation (Morgan1) it was shown that experimental fever produced in the dog and rabbit by injections of typhoid toxin is accompanied by marked chromatolysis in the nucleus tuberomamillaris and by chromatolysis of a lesser and more variable degree in the basal optic ganglia and paraventricular nucleus. Investigations bearing on the role of the hypothalamus in the regulation of body temperature have been reviewed by Fulton2 and in the preceding paper.

A study of the diencephalon in patients suffering from heat stroke suggests the following questions: (1) Has the hypothalamus been affected by previous disease or injury, or were the vegetative centers in this region apparently normal prior to the onset of the heat

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