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September 1940

CONSTITUTIONAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DETERIORATED AND NONDETERIORATED PATIENTS WITH EPILEPSYIV. THE HANDWRITING

Arch NeurPsych. 1940;44(3):507-516. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1940.02280090026002
Abstract

Previous studies have convinced us that the disorder known as idiopathic epilepsy is grossly divisible into two forms. In the one form mental deterioration occurs, and in the other it does not. The symptoms of epileptic deterioration are too well known to be repeated here; suffice it to say that its presence usually condemns the possessor to institutional care, sometimes for life. In contrast to this, most of the nondeteriorated epileptic patients are not institutionalized, because they become adjusted in the extramural world on a level comparable with that of their nonepileptic fellows. Since the nondeteriorated patients with epilepsy are seldom institutionalized, they have eluded the observation of the classic epileptologists, who were for the most part physicians in institutions. Consequently, there is a paucity of literature on the nondeteriorated epileptic patient, and the literature is especially meager in the discussion of differences between the psychotic and the nonpsychotic person

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