[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
January 1942

CONTINUOUS AMBULATORY INSULIN SHOCK TECHNIC IN TREATMENT OF SCHIZOPHRENIA: REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(1):53-56. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290010063005
Abstract

In 1940, in describing our ambulatory insulin shock technic for patients with mental disorders, we1 reported that 81 per cent of such patients who were treated with mild daily hypoglycemic shocks over a period of several months showed definite clinical improvement. The most marked improvement was observed in patients with schizophrenia. This observation was recently confirmed.2

The view was expressed that it might be necessary to treat certain patients with mild daily hypoglycemic shocks for an indefinite period in order to maintain clinical improvement. The present report deals with the cases of 2 patients with schizophrenenia treated with the ambulatory insulin shock technic over a period of two and a half years, in 1 case, and one and a fourth years in the other.

TECHNIC OF THE AMBULATORY INSULIN TREATMENT  The patients received one hypodermic injection of insulin daily at 5 a. m. and when, several hours later,

×