[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.206.194.210. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
June 1942

STUDIES ON THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: III. A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF DYSPRAXIA AND APRAXIA FOLLOWING PARTIAL AND COMPLETE SECTION OF THE CORPUS CALLOSUM

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

From the Department of Medicine, Division of Psychiatry, (Dr. Akelaitis) and the Department of Surgery, Neurological Division (Drs. Risteen, Herren and Van Wagenen), University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the Clinics of the Strong Memorial and Rochester Municipal Hospitals.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;47(6):971-1008. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290060109008
Abstract

On the basis of the concept of a unilateral cerebral dominance in man, Liepmann1 postulated that in right-handed persons the left hemisphere, by means of the corpus callosum, exercises a dominating influence on the right hemisphere. Liepmann and Maas2 concluded that involvement of the anterior portion of the corpus callosum produced "sympathetic" dyspraxia in the subordinate hand. According to Lange,3 apraxia or dyspraxia occurs most consistently after lesions of the corpus callosum or the gyrus supramarginalis of the dominant hemisphere. The studies of Baldy4 and Critchley5 on the syndrome of the anterior cerebral artery tend to substantiate the importance of the corpus callosum in the performance of purposeful and complex movements in the subordinate hand. Other investigators, such as Dandy,6 Foerster,7 Armitage and Meagher8 and Barré and associates,9 described cases of surgical section of the corpus callosum or destruction of this

×