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July 1942

CENTRAL AUTONOMIC PARALYSIS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;48(1):92-107. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290070102008
Abstract

Observations on the disturbances in sensory and motor functions produced by lesions in the brain and spinal cord in man have been of great aid in determining the motor and sensory pathways in the central nervous system. A study of the disturbances in the function of the autonomic nervous system produced by lesions in the brain and spinal cord should yield information concerning the autonomic pathways in the central nervous system. Because disturbances in autonomic function are more difficult to evaluate than the sensory and motor disturbances produced by lesions in the central nervous system, observations on central autonomic paralysis in man are few and incomplete. Those that are available are usually confined to one function of the autonomic nervous system, the study of sweating being the most common. The purpose of this paper is to describe the clinical picture of central autonomic paralysis and by a study of several

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