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August 1942

CURARE AND METRAZOL THERAPY OF PSYCHOSES: REPORT OF A FATAL CASE

Author Affiliations

NORFOLK, NEB.

From the Norfolk State Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;48(2):267-270. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290080113005
Abstract

For several years metrazol has been widely used intravenously to produce convulsions in the shock therapy of various psychoses. One of the most important disadvantages of this form of therapy has been the production of injuries by the severe convulsions. These injuries have included fractures of the dorsal vertebrae, femur, pelvis and humerus, as well as dislocations of the shoulder and mandible.1 Various workers have employed a variety of methods to reduce the severity of metrazol-induced convulsions and consequent injuries. These methods, including the use of restraints, postures, supports, splints and spinal anesthesia, have had some success, but all have important disadvantages.

Bennett2 first described the use of curare in modifying the metrazol convulsion, and numerous other workers have employed this drug, with excellent results, in preventing injuries due to convulsions.

Curare has been used since the time of Claude Bernard as a laboratory drug for blocking nerve

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