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September 1942

INTRACRANIAL AND EXTRACRANIAL VASCULAR ACCIDENTS IN MIGRAINE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Medicine, New York Hospital and Cornell University Medical College.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;48(3):396-406. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290090052003
Abstract

Migraine is usually a benign disorder, but occasionally it is associated with serious complications involving the vascular system of the head. Such an occurrence in a private patient of mine stimulated study of the literature and the following report.

REPORT OF A CASE  A woman, born in the United States in 1904 of Polish parents, married early and gave birth to a normal child. Later, at the age of 25, both uterine tubes and one ovary were removed, for an unknown cause. Subsequently menstruation, which had begun at the age of 15, became relatively scant and lasted not longer than three days. She was sexually well adjusted. In temperament she was meticulous and exacting. Her husband spontaneously remarked: "You know, she gets very nervous; she keeps the house like a mirror; she washes the curtains every two weeks; she can't stand it if I drop cigaret ashes. Sometimes she gets

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