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October 1942

BLOOD COAGULATION IN DISSEMINATED SCLEROSIS AND OTHER DISEASES OF BRAIN STEM AND CORD

Author Affiliations

MIDDLETOWN, CONN.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;48(4):509-517. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290100009001
Abstract

In 1935 Simon and Solomon1 published studies on the coagulation responses of the blood in disseminated sclerosis. Their theoretic considerations sprang from the observations of many workers2 that exacerbations of symptoms in disseminated sclerosis are often related to trauma, operation, exposure, immersion, pregnancy, infection, emotional excitement, etc.—factors cited by Pickering3 as predisposing to disturbances in the blood plasma and to thrombosis. The hypothesis that a common denominator in these situations might be a disturbance in the coagulation reactions of the blood offers a clinical basis for the observations of Putnam and associates4 that the lesions in disseminated sclerosis are the result of venous thromboses in the brain and spinal cord.

Simon and Solomon1a found that in both control cases and cases of disseminated sclerosis there was a definite drop in coagulation time after the intravenous administration of typhoid vaccine. They observed, also, a similar, but

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