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November 1942

EFFECT OF IODIZED POPPYSEED OIL ON THE SPINAL CORD AND MENINGES: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.

From the Neurologic Service of Duke Hospital and the Department of Internal Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;48(5):799-810. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290110119006
Abstract

Since the introduction of iodized poppyseed oil for myelography by Sicard in 19221a the increasing use of iodized oils intrathecally has occasioned much discussion as to the possibility of harmful effects on the meninges and the adjacent nerve tissue. It has been demonstrated that immediately after injection there is an acute cellular reaction, chiefly lymphocytic, usually associated with mild symptoms, such as slight rise in temperature, headache, pain and stiffness in the back and aggravation of root pains, reaching a peak within twelve to twenty-four hours and subsiding within four to seven days.1 There is evidence that these acute meningeal reactions are due to iodic fatty acids and hydrogen iodide resulting from splitting of the iodized oil, either before or after injection, and that certain oils are more toxic than others.2 Serious meningeal reactions have been reported in only2 cases.3 There have been occasional reports of

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