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December 1942

ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM ACCOMPANYING HYPERACTIVE CAROTID SINUS REFLEX AND ORTHOSTATIC SYNCOPE

Arch NeurPsych. 1942;48(6):957-967. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290120109007
Abstract

Since studies on the electrical activity of the cortex have shown that in sleep,1 in epileptic seizures2 and in cerebral anoxia3 characteristic changes occur, it seemed possible that similar studies might help in distinguishing between the syncope occurring with different types of hyperactive carotid sinus reflex and might lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for loss of consciousness.

The three types of carotid sinus syncope distinguished by Weiss and Baker4 are the cardiodepressor, in which pressure on the carotid sinus causes slowing of the heart rate and a subsequent critical fall in systemic blood pressure; the vasodilator, in which a critical fall in blood pressure occurs without a significant decrease in heart rate, and the central, in which consciousness is lost without a significant fall in blood pressure. Weiss and Baker pointed out, however, that these pure types are the exception rather than

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