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June 1944

SWEAT SECRETION IN MAN: VI. SPINAL REFLEX SWEATING

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Department of Surgery, Section of Neurosurgery, University of Michigan Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1944;51(6):501-507. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1944.02290300003001
Abstract

During World War I Head and Riddoch1 observed outbreaks of drenching perspiration in soldiers with severe transverse lesions of the spinal cord. They found that this type of sweating response was not thermoregulatory and that it was localized to parts of the body which received their nerve supply from segments of the spinal cord below the transverse lesion. The authors correlated the various vegetative disturbances observed with transverse lesions of the spinal cord, such as abnormal sweating and disturbance of vesical and genital functions, with the pathologic alterations in somatic functions. They pointed out that the abnormal sweating response is, like all the other changes, a manifestation of the spinal mass reflex. The observations of Head and Riddoch were confirmed and extended by Thomas,2 who emphasized the analogy between the disturbances of sweating and those of piloerection in spinal man. Since then there have been no new contributions

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