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June 1944

USE OF FURMETHIDE IN TESTING SWEAT SECRETION IN MAN

Arch NeurPsych. 1944;51(6):568-569. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1944.02290300070009
Abstract

Sweating tests for the demonstration of various neural lesions received their impetus from the simple procedure introduced by Minor.1 The use of drugs for the production of sweating has been limited chiefly to that of pilocarpine hydrochloride and mecholyl chloride (acetylbetamethylcholine chloride). Sweating tests performed in this fashion have only a limited diagnostic value, being useful chiefly for demonstration of lesions of peripheral nerves (List and Peet2). However, in certain types of war casualties, lesions of peripheral nerves are common, and it has been my experience that the use of pilocarpine hydrochloride has not been wholly satisfactory as an agent to produce sweating. The usual dose of 10 to 12 mg. of the drug too frequently induces unpleasant side reactions, including urinary urgency, nausea and vomiting, in some patients, while others do not even sweat after this dose. When smaller doses have been employed, thirty to sixty minutes

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