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September 1944

PHLEBOSTASIS AND PHLEBOTHROMBOSIS OF THE BRAIN IN THE NEWBORN AND IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Institute of New York; the Department of Neurology of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Research Laboratory for Neuropathology of Montefiore Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1944;52(3):170-188. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1944.02290330009002
Abstract

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS  In a discussion of injuries of the brain at birth three factors must be considered: the site of the lesion, its nature and its causes.

Site of Injury.  —One must consider the site first, for, except for direct lacerations, all these injuries to the brain are localized in certain drainage areas of the venous system. Veins are more easily damaged than arteries, which are well protected where they enter the base of the skull. The base is already stabilized at birth, while the vault is still movable and easily injured.The venous system in question includes various, somewhat independent, vessels. The regions involved in birth trauma are the drainage area of the great vein of Galen (vena cerebri magna) and that of the superior longitudinal sinus. The former vessel drains the blood from the centrum semiovale of the frontal and the anterior part of the parietal lobe via

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