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January 1945

DELIRIUM: III. ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH ACUTE ALCOHOLIC INTOXICATION

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

From the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and the Psychiatric Service of the Cincinnati General Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(1):44-50. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300010054004
Abstract

Previous studies of the electroencephalograms of patients with delirium have demonstrated a close correlation between changes in the electrical activity of the brain and the level of consciousness, but no correlation with the more personal aspects of behavior, such as the character or expression of anxiety, the nature of sense deceptions or the content of thought.1 The earliest changes in the electroencephalogram consisted of a progressive decrease in the frequency to the 6 to 8 per second range. In cases of more severe delirium there were increasing irregularity, disruption of synchrony with the appearance of low voltage fast activity and, finally, development of much high voltage irregular, slow activity with a frequency of 2 to 6 cycles per second. The severity of the electroencephalographic changes was related to the intensity, duration and reversibility of the noxious factors involved and to the premorbid status of the central nervous system, but

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