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April 1945

BROMINE CONTENT OF THE BLOOD IN MENTAL DISEASES: I. DEMENTIA PRECOX

Author Affiliations

COLUMBUS, OHIO

From the Department of Physiological Chemistry, Ohio State University College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1945;53(4):305-306. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1945.02300040051008
Abstract

Bromide therapy has been used for many years in the treatment of conditions associated with psychomotor disturbance and increased vasomotor irritability. From time to time the bromide content of the blood of patients with such disorders has aroused the interest of investigators. In 1931 Zondek and Bier1 reported that in 29 of 34 patients with manic-depressive psychoses who were examined the bromine content of the blood was from 40 to 60 per cent below the normal value (1 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters) previously established by them. The average value for the 34 patients was 0.572 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters. They also stated that in 5 out of 17 patients with schizophrenia studied the blood bromides were low. In 1933 the same authors2 concluded that the bromide content of the blood of patients with mental disease was likely to be low and discussed the concentration for 6

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