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January 1946

ONSET OF GUILLAIN-BARRÉ SYNDROME FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO MUSTARD GAS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Neurology Section of the Medical Service, AAF Regional and Convalescent Hospital, Miami District, Miami Beach, Fla.

Arch NeurPsych. 1946;55(1):57-58. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300120067004
Abstract

The clinical incidence of neurologic sequelae of mustard gas poisoning or exposure is rare. Mustard gas, the popular name of dichloroethyl sulfide, was known during World War I as "king of battle gases,"1 inasmuch as, pound for pound, it produced nearly eight times the number of casualties produced by all the other battle gases combined. Marshall2 concluded that systemic effects occurred in animals, due in part to absorption of mustard gas or a hydrolytic product thereof, when these animals were poisoned by inhalation, injection or cutaneous application of this substance. Winternitz3 stated that animals which died in the acute stage, before the development of extensive pneumonia, probably succumbed as a result of the combined effects of destructive changes in the lung and systemic effects from absorption of the gas. Warthin4 mentioned the following signs referable to the central nervous system in animals exposed to mustard gas

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