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March 1946

IMPORTANCE OF NEURAL FIBROBLASTS IN THE REGENERATION OF NERVE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Neurological Unit, Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School.

Arch NeurPsych. 1946;55(3):171-215. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300140002001
Abstract

It IS generally agreed that the regeneration of peripheral nerve is accomplished by the regrowth of axis-cylinders in close relation to the remnants of the Schwann cells of the degenerated nerve. Whether the Schwann bands form a medium favoring active growth or provide simply a passive linear path without obstruction is still debated.1 Few2 deny the Schwann cell any part in the process of conduction of the regenerating fiber. There is no doubt, however, that the Schwann nucleus determines the maturation of the myelin sheath at a later stage of restoration. When there has been a breach in continuity in the nerve, the outgrowing axis-cylinder bridges the gap, but the factors which aid or hinder this process are imperfectly understood. These problems have been reviewed at length by Ramón y Cajal3 and, more recently, by Young1 and by Weiss.4 They are of primary importance in

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